The Washington Post just issued a terrifying warning about Facebook

Big Tech has taken over people’s lives more than they realize.

It’s increasingly difficult to exist in the real world without engaging with popular websites and apps.

And The Washington Post just issued a terrifying warning about Facebook.

Facebook has become inextricably linked to people’s lives.

It’s the chief vector for business advertising and news dissemination.

And as Facebook has grown, so too has its encroachment on users’ privacy.

In a Washington Post piece entitled, “There’s no escape from Facebook, even if you don’t use it,” the paper warned about how Facebook is vacuuming up people’s data.

The Post reported:

“Among the 100 most popular smartphone apps, you can find Facebook software in 61 of them, app research firm Sensor Tower told me. Facebook also has trackers in about 25 percent of websites, according to privacy software maker Ghostery.

I tried my own version of…cutting Facebook and Instagram out of my life for two weeks and then tallying who sent it my data…While I was gone, Facebook got a notice when I opened Hulu to watch TV. Facebook knew when I went shopping for paint, a rocking chair and fancy beans. Facebook learned I read the websites What To Expect, Lullaby Trust and Happiest Baby. There’s no surprising Facebook when you’re expecting a baby.”

Worse yet, Facebook has shadow profiles for people who don’t even have accounts.

For example, if John Doe doesn’t have a Facebook account but all of his family members do and they list John as a sibling/father/son/etc, Facebook creates a dummy account for John simply based on networking.

Facebook also serves as a login key for many sites, and while that may seem convenient, it’s near impossible to decouple those sites from users’ Facebook accounts.

The Post continued:

“Over two weeks, Facebook tracked me on at least 95 different apps, websites and businesses, and those are just the ones I know about. It was as if Facebook had hired a private eye to prepare a dossier about my life. Why does Facebook think that’s okay? The company emailed me answers about how its tracking technology works, but declined my requests to interview its chief privacy officer or other executives about its alleged monopoly.”

This is how Big Tech has seeped into people’s lives, and it’s impossible to put the genie back in the bottle.

That’s why companies that are vigilant about privacy and security are cropping up.

Browsers and search engines like Brave are offering alternatives to the data vampires such as Google.

Stay tuned to Unmuzzled News for any updates to this ongoing story.

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